National health systems throughout the world

 Rationale

Reading logs help students interact with reference materials. They provide a record of what students have read and a starter to discuss what they achieved by reading it. They help students reflect on themselves as readers.

Reading log entry criteria

1. The correct citation of the reference;

2. The main thesis of the reference;

3. Any predictions or applicability to future states or about what might happen next;

4. How you felt about what you have read in terms of accuracy, applicability, reliability, validity and generalizability;

5. Issues in the reading that you agree with;

6. Issues in the reading that you disagree with

7. Why the material read is useful (or not).

The Task

1.For module 1 (Module 1, 2 and 3) pick two articles from the course reference resources/bibliography which are (1The Australian Population and its Health

2Health Systems and Disadvantaged Groups)

plus one that is not on the list (has been discovered by literature searches etc. which is (1The Australian Population and its Health)

2.Using the above seven (7) criteria listed in the rationale section, write at least 200 words and no more than 300 words on each of the reference materials selected

3.For the article that is non-course (that you found by literature search) you must supply a copy of the reference by:

o scanning and attaching to your reading log; or

o supplying a hyperlink to the actual article.

o Provide enough reference for each module at least three per each module

3 Separate Articles

Australian health 2010

 ‘Australia’s health 2010’, Australia’s health the … biennial report of the Australian Institute of Health, Australian Govt. Pub. Service, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 17-60.

This article discusses about the changes in the Australian population, comparing Australia with other countries, perceptions of health and life, functioning, disability and health, long term conditions, the causes of death and the impact of disease on the Australian people (Australia’s health 2010). This covers the large variety of health issues in Australia in relation to the population. According to this article, the life expectancy of Australia is very high and it is said to be among the highest globally (Duckett, 2004).  However, the health status of the country remains at a good position holding a third position on 17 of 31 comparable indicators. The fertility rates of the Australian people are said to be high although the death rate is also high (Australia’s health 2010).

A big population of the people with disabilities are said to have symptoms of mental disorders, indicating that they health status is not good (Duckett, 2004). Coronary diseases are among the leading causes of deaths among the men while breast cancer causes most of the deaths among the females. Type 2 diabetes is linked to diseases burden because it increases the people’s vulnerability to diseases (Holman, 1999). The trend in life expectancy show that has a very high life expectancy of 79.0 years among the men and 83.7 years among the women and this is second after Japan in the international comparisons. Even though the life expectancy is high and the birth rate is also high, the rates of mortality are much higher leading to smaller population. This is because some conditions and coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are still a challenge to the health conditions of the country (Holman, 1999).

National health systems throughout the world

Roemer, M 1993, ‘National health systems throughout the world’, Annual Reviews, vol. 14, pp. 335-353

This article discusses about the changes that have taken place in the US health systems and how these changes have improved health systems. It provides the tools and elements composed in the plan for change in the health systems (World Health Organization, 2000). The entrepreneurial health systems have been discusses in detail showing the elements used in this kind of health system. Health systems from across the world have been used to show the how different health systems are effective (Roemer, 1993). This also provides a structure for counties to improve their health systems. Some of the health examples given include Germany and Great Britain.

This article does not only focus on the developed countries but also on the developing countries such as Sri Lanka which have managed to successfully provide comprehensive health system to her people. A health system is seen to be comprehensive if the members of that particular country have adequate access to quality health services (Roemer, 1993). The factors that have hindered the United States from attaining a comprehensive health system have also been explored. These factors highlight on the areas that should be addresses to ensure that the population of a particular country have access to adequate and quality health care. This article also provides an analysis of the national health systems of different countries across the world (World Health Organization, 2003).

Work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam: A national reporting system model

Marucci-Wellman, H., Wegman, D. H., Leamon, T. B., Tuyet Binh, T. T., Diep, N. B., & Kriebel, D. (2013). Work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam: A national reporting system model. American journal of public health, 103(11), 1989-1996.

This article discusses on how work-related injuries are reported in the developing countries. It discusses several models that are used in reporting these cases of injury specifically in Vietnam. The health surveillance models need to focus on injuries in the society because they are a major cause of diseases and deaths (Rosenman et al, 2006). Therefore, work-related injury surveillance models have been designed to report these injuries and risks in the health system of Vietnam. These models help in identifying the rate of the work-related injuries occur. An extended passive surveillance model is recommended for Vietnam and it should include hospital and CHS reporting (Marucci-Wellman et al, 2013). These systems help in identifying the rates at which injury occurs in different working environments and this helps in identifying areas that need improvements to improve health and safety of workers (Sorock, 1997). The efforts to reduce work-related injury risks need to be intensified so that the health system can be able to address the cases and improve the work environments for the workers (Rosenman et al, 2006).

The findings gained from the surveillance models enable the health systems to address the work-related injuries, risks, and manage them. The health sector cannot overlook the effects of work-related injuries because they are a health concern that has been overlooked for a long time. This article also focuses on the “improvements in the sensitivity of data collection on work-related injuries, which includes the collection of information on industries, occupations, and populations at risk; types and causes of injuries: and measures on the severity of burden” (Marucci-Wellman et al, 2013).  When this is carried out, then the health systems are improved to ensure that the problem is tackled (Sorock, 1997).

References

 ‘Australia’s health 2010’, Australia’s health the … biennial report of the Australian Institute of Health, Australian Govt. Pub. Service, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 17-60.

Duckett, S. (2004). The Australian health care system.

Holman, C. A. J., Bass, A. J., Rouse, I. L., & Hobbs, M. S. (1999). Population‐based linkage of health records in Western Australia: development of a health services research linked database. Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 23(5), 453-459.

Marucci-Wellman, H., Wegman, D. H., Leamon, T. B., Tuyet Binh, T. T., Diep, N. B., & Kriebel, D. (2013). Work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam: A national reporting system model. American journal of public health, 103(11), 1989-1996.

Roemer, M 1993, ‘National health systems throughout the world’, Annual Reviews, vol. 14, pp. 335-353

Rosenman, K. D., Kalush, A., Reilly, M. J., Gardiner, J. C., Reeves, M., & Luo, Z. (2006). How much work-related injury and illness is missed by the current national surveillance system?. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 48(4), 357-365.

Sorock, G. S., Smith, G. S., Reeve, G. R., Dement, J., Stout, N., Layne, L., & Pastula, S. T. (1997). Three perspectives on work‐related injury surveillance systems. American journal of industrial medicine, 32(2), 116-128.

World Health Organization (Ed.). (2003). The world health report 2003: shaping the future. World Health Organization.

World Health Organization. (2000). The world health report 2000: health systems: improving performance. World Health Organization.

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