Health myths

Topic: Find at least five Internet or magazine articles/advertisements which depict an
exercise or health myth. Why do you think that the media and advertisers are pushing
these myths? What should the article or advertisement say that would make the fallacy
corre

Introduction

There are many health myths that people tend to believe. These myths are normally
untrue or at least are not proven through a scientific test. Some of these myths are so common
that doctors tend to believe in them and they end up advising patients to take note on these
myths. Many of these myths have been passed on from one generation to another but some
scientists have tried to crack the truth about these myths.
Sugar makes kids hyper

One of the most popular myths is that a high intake of sugar raises a child’s activity.
Many people believe that sugar makes children to exhibit hyperactive behavior (Chang 2012).
Many parents report to notice that their children display sudden bursts or hyperactive behavior
after consuming sugar from sweets or cake (Chang 2012). The media and advertisers are
misinformed about the link between sugar intake and hyperactivity. This leads them to propagate
the notion that sugar indeed leads to hyperactivity in kids. This wrong information is what
misleads many people especially parents.
What the media and advertisers need to do is to relay correct information to the general
public. The myth about the link between sugar and hyperactivity should be disbanded because it
is incorrect and lacks scientific proof. Children are generally energetic and when they display
hyperactive behavior this should be considered as normal (Chang 2012). According to Chang

HEALTH MYTHS 2
(2012), many people have also blamed sugar intake on attention deficit and hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD).

Conclusion

It is important that parents should not blame sugar when their children suddenly display
hyperactive behavior. They should look for other culprits that are likely to increase hyperactivity.
Parents should also source for information that has been scientifically proven and therefore not
rely on myths that are passed on from one person to another.

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References

Chang, S. (2012). Can Sugar Really Make Kids Hyperactive? Retrieved on 28 th August 2013.

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