Empirically supported Treatments (ESTs

  1. Description of the two Empirically supported Treatments (ESTs)
    (Cognitive behavior therapy for generalized anxiety disorder)
    (Interpersonal therapy for depression )
  2. Descriptions of specifics on the strengths and weaknesses of the empirical support for
    each treatment.
  3. Explain which client populations the research suggests might benefit most from each
    treatment you selected.
  4. Provide an example of how each treatment might vary with individual differences and
    multicultural contexts.
  5. How do these EST examples fit into the broader concept of evidence-based practice?
    References
    Cox, D., & D’Oyley, H. (2011). Cognitive-behavioral therapy with older adults. British
    Columbia Medical Journal, 53(7), 348-352.
    Coleman, D. (2006). Interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents. Child &
    Adolescent Social Work Journal, 23(1), 127-130. doi:10.1007/s10560-005-0040-7
    American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental
    disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.
    Cukrowicz, K. C., Timmons, K. A., Sawyer, K., Caron, K. M., Gummelt, H. D., & Joiner,
    T. r. (2011). Improved treatment outcome associated with the shift to empirically
    supported treatments in an outpatient clinic is maintained over a ten-year period.
    Professional Psychology: Research And Practice, 42(2), 145-152. doi:10.1037/a0021937
    Herbert, J. D., & Gaudiano, B. A. (2005). Moving from empirically supported treatment
    lists to practice guidelines in psychotherapy: The role of the placebo concept. Journal of
    Clinical Psychology, 61(7), 893-908.

Empirically supported Treatments (ESTs

Cognitive behavior therapy for generalized anxiety disorder is a disorder that is based on
the theory, which states that the disorder originates from the individual perception of the world
as a bad place. This therefore leads to maladaptive and habitual interactions in the behavioral,
cognitive, and physiological responses systems (Cox & D’Oyley, 2011). Some of the signs of

EMPIRICALLY SUPPORTED TREATMENTS (ESTS 2
maladaptive cognitive responses includes selective biasness to threatening cues, worrisome
thinking and negatively valance thinking. The cognitive of the individual is also prone to avoid
anxious experiences. To manage the maladaptive behaviors an individual is supposed to try to
avoid the behaviors subtly, make decisions slowly. The client can also manage the condition
through self monitoring by pay close attention to their lives of anxiety and interactive patterns
of worrying, physiological activity, catastrophic imager and external cues that trigger these
responses.
On the other hand, interpersonal therapy is concerned about interpersonal relationships of
a person that is depressed (Coleman, 2006). Individual that are depressed can treat this condition
through improving their communication patterns and their general social skill with the other
people. Technique used to manage the condition includes identifying ones emotion and the
source. This allows an individual to understand the strategies to manage the same. Furthermore,
people depressed can also express their emotions in a healthy manner and handling appropriately
the emotional baggage.
These empirically supported treated have both strength and weaknesses. The strength of
Interpersonal therapy for depression is in early replacement of the maladaptive responses. If this
is done early, there is higher chance of reducing anxiety and preventing any further complication
(Cukrowicz, Timmons, Sawyer, Caron, Gummelt & Joiner, 2011). It also helps to strengthen the
memory of an individual, which in turn helps to reinforce the adaptive coping sequence of a
person. Therefore, chance or recovering becomes higher. The weakness of this treatment is that it
depends of the individual own self-monitoring and if an individual is not able to detect the
maladaptive behaviors the situation may come out of hand. Complication may affect the
individual coping sequences and methods.

EMPIRICALLY SUPPORTED TREATMENTS (ESTS 3
On the other hand, the strength of Interpersonal therapy for depression treatment is that it
is easy to administer and can be modified to suit the adolescent. Its weakness is that the model
has not yet been modified to manage psychoses. Therefore, an expert must administer it because
it is it risky if inappropriately adopted.
Research suggests that cognitive behavior therapy for generalized anxiety disorder is
beneficial across the population while Interpersonal therapy for depression is of great benefit to
the elderly population (Shah et al. 2013).
These treatments do vary depending on the individual differences, multicultural effects
and many other factors. Cognitive behavior therapy for generalized anxiety disorder can affect
any person that may be exposed to an event that causes maladaptive behaviors. It is more prone
to individuals that are always worried hence cuts across various cultures (American Psychiatric
Association, 2013). On the other hand, Interpersonal therapy for depression is more prevalence
to older people. This people are more afraid of their tomorrow and therefore, they tend to feel
lonely and worried about the future. It is more prevalence to western societies where many
elderly people are filled with feeling of seclusion because they live secluded lives away from
their children that are working
EST examples fit into the broader concept of evidence-based practice because it is
required that decisions based on treatment of these disorder be made based on research studies
that must be interpreted in accordance to certain norms attributes (Herbert & Gaudiano, 2005).
Therefore, certain methodology are required to be adopted in reaching any assumptions about
the disorders.

EMPIRICALLY SUPPORTED TREATMENTS (ESTS 4

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.
Coleman, D. (2006). Interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents. Child &
Adolescent Social Work Journal, 23(1), 127-130.

Looking for Discount?

You'll get a high-quality service, that's for sure.

To welcome you, we give you a 20% discount on your All orders! use code - NWS20

Discount applies to orders from $30
All Rights Reserved, Nursingwritingservice.com
Disclaimer: You will use the product (paper) for legal purposes only and you are not authorized to plagiarize. In addition, neither our website nor any of its affiliates and/or partners shall be liable for any unethical, inappropriate, illegal, or otherwise wrongful use of the Products and/or other written material received from the Website. This includes plagiarism, lawsuits, poor grading, expulsion, academic probation, loss of scholarships / awards / grants/ prizes / titles / positions, failure, suspension, or any other disciplinary or legal actions. Purchasers of Products from the Website are solely responsible for any and all disciplinary actions arising from the improper, unethical, and/or illegal use of such Products.